Cut | Color | Post

Ryan Holmes Cut Color Post. Excerpts, quips, and musings on the production and post-production industry of editing, color grading, and deliverables.

FCP 7 on Yosemite

Oh, and that was running Yosemite version 10.10 so we know Final Cut Pro Classic is still working on Apple’s latest operating system. At least for now. I even went between Final Cut Pro 7 and Final Cut Pro X on the same day so the two FCPs are living together in perfect harmony. At least for now.

I can only imagine the outrage that will ensue the day that FCP 7 no longer runs on the newest Mac OS. Never mind the fact that FCP 7 is now 3.5 years (and counting) beyond its supported shelf life. It was EOL'ed June 2011. As a corollary, if you're still using FCP 7 it's time to move on - Avid, Adobe, Autodesk, and Apple all have excellent software options.


Matt Haag Makes His Living Playing Video Games

Mr. Haag has 1.5 million YouTube subscribers along with a lucrative contract to live-stream his daily game sessions online. Known as Nadeshot (shorthand for “grenade shot”), he travels the world playing tournaments as spectators pack arenas to see him. At home near Chicago, he has a problem with fans showing up at his house.

In case anybody thought my previous post from Philip Hodgetts about Twitch being something that is competing for eyeballs was a joke...it's also competing for serious advertiser dollars!


How to Spend the Last 10 Minutes of Your Day

We often dismiss a little morning fatigue as an inconvenience, but here’s the reality. Missing sleep worsens your mood, weakens your memory, and harms your decision-making all day long. It scatters your focus, prevents you from thinking flexibly, and makes you more susceptible to anxiety. (Ever wonder why problems seem so much more overwhelming at 1:00am than in the first light of day? It’s because our brains amplify fear when we’re tired.)When we arrive at work sleepy, everything feels harder and takes longer. According to one study, we are no more effective working sleep-deprived than we are when we’re legally drunk.

There's some good tips in here that can probably help you unwind at the end of the day - the most important one, ironically, setting a hard bedtime for yourself. I guess my mother was right about that!


Competing for Your Most Valuable Resource

Philip Hodgetts in regards to Twitch (it's like YouTube for video games):

Watching game play has become a huge audience, with very low production costs. While it’s not traditional production, the time spent watching gamers play video games, erodes the time available for other forms of entertainment, specifically films and television!

I think this concept stretches to many different mediums now. Your Xbox, iPhone, AppleTV, Roku, traditional broadcast TV, cinema, Redbox, YouTube, Twitch, Twitter, Facebook...they are all competing for your most valuable resource - your time. We all have the same amount of hours in a week and how we chose to spend them means we're choosing one medium/format over another.


How To Answer The Toughest Job Interview Question: 'Tell Me About Yourself’

The way you respond to this question will decide the success of the interview and ultimately whether or not you will get the job. Don’t worry too much– the interviewer is on your side and they want to hire you. They want more than anything for you to crush the interview, so that they can stop spending hours reviewing resumes and doing interviews.

Having been through a few job interviews in my day, I can say that this is one of the most challenging questions to answer. How much should I say? What should I include? Most importantly, what should I exclude?

As an interviewer now screening candidates, I can say that I don't put that much weight on the question as this piece implies. But I do still ask it, usually as a way to relax the candidate. In fact, I'm usually more concerned with how a person carries them self in the interview - how they act, their demeanor, and most importantly their sense of humor (or lack thereof). Most skills can be taught, but personality is a priceless intangible.

The GH4 and DSLR Cinematography

In fairness though, the GH4 is not so much a ‘replacement’ for a professional cinema camera, more an additional option for the filmmaker which will be selected when the unique abilities of the tool are required by certain work. The simple fact that there’s even a comparison to be made to a $15,000 cinema camera says a lot about how far Panasonic has reached to connect with filmmakers.

I think you could also say how well designed, both ergonomically and technologically, the C300 is, that even after 3 years of being on the market it still sells/rents so well. As a corporate video pro the C300 is my preferred camera for shoots. I can shoot outside in bright daylight, inside in a dimly lit environments with minimal extra gear (rigs, recorders, XLR packs, screens, etc.). Everything I need to pull of a quick shot is onboard the C300 from Day 1. Even today in the growing world of 4k this and 4k that, the C300 still creates a crisp 1080p image that I turn to time and again for my day-to-day work.

That said, there are more and more cameras that are starting to look appealing to me (none of which are DSLR based cameras). Specifically, the Sony FS7, when it ships, looks like another winner for cinema, corporate, or event shooters. The XAVC codec continues to get praise from every corner of the industry. Sony may have finally produced a camera "for the rest of us" in the FS7 for around $8K according to pre-order pages.