Cut | Color | Post

Ryan Holmes Cut Color Post. Excerpts, quips, and musings on the production and post-production industry of editing, color grading, and deliverables.

Try Before You Buy AJA CION

If you're interested in the AJA CION then you may be in luck. AJA is running a promotional program to push the camera into the hands of the production community. If you fill out a short questionnaire and submit that to AJA they'll determine if your project meets the criteria for them to loan you a camera (and some corresponding gear) for your shoot. 

Ready to try the CION production camera on your own shoot?

Simply fill out the form below to start the application process. Your application will be reviewed by AJA, and if approved, you’ll be notified when to expect delivery of your loaner CION camera and associated accessories. We will begin the approval process soon!

Once you receive your CION camera you’ll be able to see for yourself the cinematic, film-like quality of CION.

Please note that the #TryCION program is currently available in North America only. Be sure to read the details of the program at the bottom of this page.

You can check out AJA #TRYCION program here.

Samsung Develops 16TB SSD

The piece goes on to say, “In 2013, Samsung announced a new way of approaching flash storage manufacturing. Rather than place the cells along a single layer, as had been standard practice since NAND flash was invented in the 1980s, it would stack them vertically. That allows for much greater density, which gives you much more storage space.

This could radically transform post-production. As cameras get more and more data rate intensive with HDR, UHD, 4K or higher resolutions our ability to access that data quickly for realtime playback becomes an ever increasing challenge. This could provide both speed and size flexibility for post professionals.

Read more here or here.

C300 Mark II Likely To Cost More Than Sony FS7

In regards to the upcoming NAB 2015, here's a nugget from Canon Rumors:

This will be the star of Canon’s show. It will shoot 4K and you can also expect some minor ergonomic changes. We also think that it’s going to cost more than Sony’s FS7.

Unfortunately, I think this is completely accurate. While the C300 Mark II should only cost $8K, like the Sony FS7, I'm guessing it'll cost closer to $10K or even $12K (or $16K as announced on April 8). Reason being: I don't think Canon believes the FS7 to be a competitor to this camera. I can see why Canon would believe this, but in the marketplace the consumer sees these two cameras as in the same class, even if the manufacturers do not.

I think this line of reasoning is further supported if you look at Canon's current price breakdown pyramid for their Cinema EOS lineup (current mark down pricing is listed below):

Canon C100 Mark 1 - $2,999 (link)

Canon C100 Mark II - $5,499 (link)

Canon C300 Mark I - $6,999 (link)

Canon C300 Mark II - $15,999 (link) - updated after Canon announcement

Canon C500 Mark I - $15,999 (link)

Canon C500 Mark II - $19,999 or $24,999 (speculative)

I also wouldn't be surprised for Canon to pull a page out of Apple's iPhone playbook and continue to sell the previous version of their Cinema EOS camera at a reduced price. That would allow Canon to sell a Cinema EOS camera at nearly every price point. And if there's one thing that Canon (and Apple) is good at it's providing a product offering at nearly every conceivable price point (specs are different story!). If the product pyramid that I've outlined above holds that would allow Canon to sell a camera as inexpensively as $3K and as premium as $25K.

Additionally, if you're in the market for a great 1080p camera the original C100's and C300's are absolute steals at those prices. Since 98% of projects today (2015) are finished and presented in HD 1080i/p, those cameras will still get the job done well for the next several years. I have no intention of giving my EOS cameras up at this point, and may even add an additional one soon!

Moving From FCP to PPro

Meagan Keane of Adobe interviews editor, Andrea B. Scott, on the 2015 Sundance Film Festival documentary "Fresh Dressed"

Adobe: Which features of Adobe Premiere Pro CC were most useful?

Scott: Certain aspects of working within the timeline are much easier than with Final Cut Pro. Even small things are really nice, like the ability to hoverscrub through the footage. Another helpful feature of working with Premiere Pro CC is its ability to work with different codecs in the timeline, without worrying about transcoding.

I'll continue to say it: all modern NLE's are capable of producing high-quality content for broadcast television or film. Apple Final Cut Pro X, Adobe Premiere Pro CC, and Avid Media Composer all have the ability to cut your story and cut it well. The difference is in the user and which product makes the most sense for a given workflow. Stop the nonsense about whether not NLE is faster than that NLE, or if <fill in the blank> NLE is "pro"...they are all capable choices in the hands of the right person.