Cut | Color | Post

Ryan Holmes Cut Color Post. Excerpts, quips, and musings on the production and post-production industry of editing, color grading, and deliverables.

C300 Mark II Likely To Cost More Than Sony FS7

In regards to the upcoming NAB 2015, here's a nugget from Canon Rumors:

This will be the star of Canon’s show. It will shoot 4K and you can also expect some minor ergonomic changes. We also think that it’s going to cost more than Sony’s FS7.

Unfortunately, I think this is completely accurate. While the C300 Mark II should only cost $8K, like the Sony FS7, I'm guessing it'll cost closer to $10K or even $12K (or $16K as announced on April 8). Reason being: I don't think Canon believes the FS7 to be a competitor to this camera. I can see why Canon would believe this, but in the marketplace the consumer sees these two cameras as in the same class, even if the manufacturers do not.

I think this line of reasoning is further supported if you look at Canon's current price breakdown pyramid for their Cinema EOS lineup (current mark down pricing is listed below):

Canon C100 Mark 1 - $2,999 (link)

Canon C100 Mark II - $5,499 (link)

Canon C300 Mark I - $6,999 (link)

Canon C300 Mark II - $15,999 (link) - updated after Canon announcement

Canon C500 Mark I - $15,999 (link)

Canon C500 Mark II - $19,999 or $24,999 (speculative)

I also wouldn't be surprised for Canon to pull a page out of Apple's iPhone playbook and continue to sell the previous version of their Cinema EOS camera at a reduced price. That would allow Canon to sell a Cinema EOS camera at nearly every price point. And if there's one thing that Canon (and Apple) is good at it's providing a product offering at nearly every conceivable price point (specs are different story!). If the product pyramid that I've outlined above holds that would allow Canon to sell a camera as inexpensively as $3K and as premium as $25K.

Additionally, if you're in the market for a great 1080p camera the original C100's and C300's are absolute steals at those prices. Since 98% of projects today (2015) are finished and presented in HD 1080i/p, those cameras will still get the job done well for the next several years. I have no intention of giving my EOS cameras up at this point, and may even add an additional one soon!


Moving From FCP to PPro

Meagan Keane of Adobe interviews editor, Andrea B. Scott, on the 2015 Sundance Film Festival documentary "Fresh Dressed"

Adobe: Which features of Adobe Premiere Pro CC were most useful?

Scott: Certain aspects of working within the timeline are much easier than with Final Cut Pro. Even small things are really nice, like the ability to hoverscrub through the footage. Another helpful feature of working with Premiere Pro CC is its ability to work with different codecs in the timeline, without worrying about transcoding.

I'll continue to say it: all modern NLE's are capable of producing high-quality content for broadcast television or film. Apple Final Cut Pro X, Adobe Premiere Pro CC, and Avid Media Composer all have the ability to cut your story and cut it well. The difference is in the user and which product makes the most sense for a given workflow. Stop the nonsense about whether not NLE is faster than that NLE, or if <fill in the blank> NLE is "pro"...they are all capable choices in the hands of the right person.


Should A Video Editor Buy a Mac Pro or iMac

If money is not a big concern, don’t waste any more time – get the Mac Pro. While the 12-core system provides maximum bragging rights, the 8-core system is a better value with great performance.

If your budget is constrained, get an iMac. It is outstanding as an editing system and, while not as fast in video compression or rendering, what you lose in time you’ll save in dollars.

I run both at my shop and they each have distinct advantages (the 5K Retina screen is gorgeous). It's always a trade-off between speed and cost. The faster you want to go, the more money it's going to cost. For many of today's task an iMac is a great machine. But if you need the horsepower for transcoding you're not going to beat a Mac Pro.


Amazon Studios Looks to The Big Screen

The media production arm of the e-commerce giant will produce and acquire up to 12 original films a year that will premiere on Prime Instant Video 4 to 8 weeks after their theatrical debut. This is a much shorter time frame than the typical 39 to 52 weeks it takes for movies to make it to a streaming platform.

This story got buried in my notes. Amazon announced this back in January, and if you take a look at Prime Instant Video you can see they've started to make up ground on their competitors for recent content.


Canon 5D Mark IV

Northlight is reporting they’ve been told that the EOS 5D Mark IV isn’t scheduled to be announced until the fall of 2015 at the earliest, and that we won’t be seeing it until the EOS 5DS/5DS R are shipping in reasonable numbers. It was interesting that they also mentioned that current EOS 5D Mark III sales are still good and that may delay the release of the EOS 5D Mark IV until after the EOS-1D X Mark II is announced. It sounds like this has yet to be decided.

If true, I find that very interesting, particularly that the "Mark III sales are still good." While many people bag on Canon's lack of "innovation" (I'm looking at you EOSHD.com) their products sell well to many segments - photo, video, news, cinema, etc. While I also hope Canon releases some face-melting cameras this year, they are a business. And if their products are selling well it's understandable that they may delay an announcement for a replacement product to avoid the Osborne effect.