Cut|Color|Post

excerpts, quips, and musings on the production and post-production industry, and other stuff of interest

Moving From FCP to PPro

Meagan Keane of Adobe interviews editor, Andrea B. Scott, on the 2015 Sundance Film Festival documentary "Fresh Dressed"

Adobe: Which features of Adobe Premiere Pro CC were most useful?

Scott: Certain aspects of working within the timeline are much easier than with Final Cut Pro. Even small things are really nice, like the ability to hoverscrub through the footage. Another helpful feature of working with Premiere Pro CC is its ability to work with different codecs in the timeline, without worrying about transcoding.

I'll continue to say it: all modern NLE's are capable of producing high-quality content for broadcast television or film. Apple Final Cut Pro X, Adobe Premiere Pro CC, and Avid Media Composer all have the ability to cut your story and cut it well. The difference is in the user and which product makes the most sense for a given workflow. Stop the nonsense about whether not NLE is faster than that NLE, or if <fill in the blank> NLE is "pro"...they are all capable choices in the hands of the right person.


5 Features I miss from FCP7

I spent most of the last week of November working on a job in Final Cut Pro 7; or Final Cut Classic as we seem to call it these days. This was the first FCP7 job I had done in over a year (at least I think as they all run together after awhile). Cutting in FCP7 was at the client’s request and while I have tried to convince them to move to a more modern NLE this job was to be an FCP7 job. It went well and I made a note of five features that I miss when working in other NLEs.

I especially miss the keyboard shortcut editor and the ability to open multiple projects side-by-side. FCP7 had those features exactly right! Here's to hoping FCPX, Avid, and Adobe work those in better in future releases...


Final Cut X Update - 10.1.4

Larry Jordan has a good write up on the most recent Apple FCPX update. The most recent update certainly seems aimed squarely at the high-end post-production professional with MXF support, AVC-Intra additions, and high frame rate fixes. However, his concluding section gave me the most pause:

There will be much more to come. Apple is not turning their back on the application, but releasing new updates and upgrades essentially every few weeks.

The recent growth of Premiere Pro and rapid development cycles from Adobe are an excellent incentive for Apple to keep pace. Competition is a wonderful thing.

While many can, and do, quibble with Adobe's subscription model it seems hard to deny the speed at which Adobe now moves to update and bug fix their software. That has ripple effects across the market - Avid, Apple, Autodesk have to respond to that development speed or risk losing ground. I've not hidden my support and daily use of Adobe's Creative Cloud for my post-production team, but what I support even more is the overall competition. If Adobe pushes Apple, and Apple pushes Avid, and Avid pushes Apple, that's just fine by me. We're the ones who benefit from that competition.


FCP 7 on Yosemite

Oh, and that was running Yosemite version 10.10 so we know Final Cut Pro Classic is still working on Apple’s latest operating system. At least for now. I even went between Final Cut Pro 7 and Final Cut Pro X on the same day so the two FCPs are living together in perfect harmony. At least for now.

I can only imagine the outrage that will ensue the day that FCP 7 no longer runs on the newest Mac OS. Never mind the fact that FCP 7 is now 3.5 years (and counting) beyond its supported shelf life. It was EOL'ed June 2011. As a corollary, if you're still using FCP 7 it's time to move on - Avid, Adobe, Autodesk, and Apple all have excellent software options.


Why Don't Developers Spend More Time Fixing Bugs

One of the complaints I hear frequently is: “Why don’t developers spend more time fixing bugs and less time adding new features?” And the answer is: They can’t afford it. Finding and fixing bugs is ridiculously time-consuming and often isolated to specific systems or system configurations. Fixing bugs is necessary, true; but really, really difficult. And we all expect that upgrades to fix bugs will be free.

And therein lies the rub. We want bugs squashed, but we don't want to pay any money for it (historically we've never had to pay for bug fixes). However, as this digital age continues to "grow up" business models have to adapt.

While Larry's post isn't directly aimed at Adobe's CC model it certainly has that in view. Subscription based software is actually moving through all the major media players, save for Apple who doesn't need to move to that model because their money is made from hardware sales (iPhone, iPad, Mac, etc).** But Adobe, Avid, Autodesk, Red Giant, and the Foundry have all moved towards subscription plans for either outright use or maintenance packages.

** You could also make a case that Blackmagic Design won't move towards subscriptions because they also generate a substantial portion of their income from hardware sales. With their ever broadening line of cameras, routers, converters, and switchers software just becomes an add-on that is used to entice a consumer (licensed version of DaVinci Resolve given out with any camera purchase). 


Adobe Doubles Down on Lightroom

Put simply we’re doubling down on our investments in Lightroom and the new Creative Cloud Photography plan and you can expect to see a rich roadmap of rapid innovation for desktop, web and device workflows in the coming weeks, months and years. We also continue to invest actively on the iOS and OSX platforms, and are committed to helping interested iPhoto and Aperture customers migrate to our rich solution across desktop, device and web workflows.

As I mentioned earlier, if you're not an Adobe Creative Cloud user for Lightroom/Photoshop there's never been a better time to start.


Apple Kills Aperture Development

If you watched Apple's 2014 WWDC presentation then you probably saw this one coming. Apple is ending development of Aperture and iPhoto for OS X. The new app Photos is scheduled to replace the professional and consumer apps. From Jim Dalrymple of The Loop:

Apple introduced a new Photos app during its Worldwide Developers Conference that will become the new platform for the company. As part of the transition, Apple told me today that they will no longer be developing its professional photography application, Aperture.

“With the introduction of the new Photos app and iCloud Photo Library, enabling you to safely store all of your photos in iCloud and access them from anywhere, there will be no new development of Aperture,” said Apple in a statement provided to The Loop. “When Photos for OS X ships next year, users will be able to migrate their existing Aperture libraries to Photos for OS.”

You can add this to the growing line of professional apps that Apple has killed off without warning for users - Shake, Final Cut Server, Final Cut Pro 7, DVD Studio Pro, etc. It's one of the reasons that I am not a skeptical Apple software users. Any Apple software I use I do so with the intent of not marrying myself to it because inevitably Apple will pull the rug out from under you.

At least this time it appears that Apple will give users a way to migrate their libraries from Aperture to the new Photos app. Something I wish would've been allowed when FCP X was released in 2011.

This is also a great time to add, if you're not a Lightroom CC user there's no better time to join up!