Cut|Color|Post

excerpts, quips, and musings on the production and post-production industry, and other stuff of interest

Mmmmmmm...Smells Like Vaporware

Frame.io writing in their most recent newsletter:

It’s been 6 months since the first announcement, this smells like vaporware

The app is very real and works exactly as advertised. But it’s true, we’re behind schedule. When we announced Frame.io in July of 2014 we were overly optimistic about our target release date. It’s a complex app that you will come to rely on for your business. We take this very seriously and want to make sure you can count on us.

I hope that Frame can move from vaporware to an actual shipping product because their take on review and approval looks excellent. But if you need something today, their solution isn't going to get the job done. If you need a review and approval solution today then check out Scott Simmons' post from May 2014. There are quite a few good options out there already.


Matt Haag Makes His Living Playing Video Games

Mr. Haag has 1.5 million YouTube subscribers along with a lucrative contract to live-stream his daily game sessions online. Known as Nadeshot (shorthand for “grenade shot”), he travels the world playing tournaments as spectators pack arenas to see him. At home near Chicago, he has a problem with fans showing up at his house.

In case anybody thought my previous post from Philip Hodgetts about Twitch being something that is competing for eyeballs was a joke...it's also competing for serious advertiser dollars!


Competing for Your Most Valuable Resource

Philip Hodgetts in regards to Twitch (it's like YouTube for video games):

Watching game play has become a huge audience, with very low production costs. While it’s not traditional production, the time spent watching gamers play video games, erodes the time available for other forms of entertainment, specifically films and television!

I think this concept stretches to many different mediums now. Your Xbox, iPhone, AppleTV, Roku, traditional broadcast TV, cinema, Redbox, YouTube, Twitch, Twitter, Facebook...they are all competing for your most valuable resource - your time. We all have the same amount of hours in a week and how we chose to spend them means we're choosing one medium/format over another.


HBO Goes Over The Top

HBO announced Wednesday that it would start a stand-alone Internet streaming service in the United States in 2015 that would not require a subscription to a traditional television service, a move that intensifies the premium cable network’s growing rivalry with Netflix.

[...]

“The tech companies of the world have turned it on faster and better,” said Jeffrey L. Bewkes, the chief executive of HBO’s parent Time Warner. “We have also had to say today, we’re also going to do it.”

Several details for HBO’s new service remain to be worked out, including what content is available, the subscription fee and the distribution models. HBO now makes its programming available over the web to paying TV subscribers through its HBO Go service. Executives said that the content available through its new online-only offering would be similar. HBO is unlikely to undercut the $15 monthly rate viewers pay to cable or satellite companies for a subscription to the service, executives said.

The question intensifies: Can HBO become like Netflix sooner than Netflix can become like HBO? Netflix pushed into HBO's territory with original series like House of Cards, Orange is the New Black, Hemlock Grove, Lilyhammer, and others. HBO now responds to Netflix by going direct to customers with a subscription (read: Netflix) plan.

I still wonder if they charge $15/month will they restrict access to older content, thereby giving the traditional HBO subscription through a telco some legitimacy for existence. Color me disappointed if they charge $15/month for just new releases or "some" of HBO's content.

More information regarding HBO's announcement from Re/code

Everyone in the TV Business Should be Reevaluating How Important the Broadcast Business Is

“Everyone in the TV business should be reevaluating how important the broadcast business is,” media analyst Rich Greenfield told me this week in a post-Emmys discussion. “Everyone sees that behavior is changing. Either you should be exiting the TV business, or driving reverse retrans fees dramatically higher – taking dollars from the TV stations.”

While hyperbolic there's still a nugget of truth contained in here. Broadcast viewership tends to be declining, but this trend isn't linear, meaning it can change. The cries about broadcast or cable dying seem reminiscent of pundits decrying the end of cinema because TV was invented. Cinema didn't dye or fade to black, it adapted to the culture and became something different. I fully expect broadcast and cable TV to do the same in the face of mobile users and incumbent Internet giants—Netflix, Amazon, Twitter, Facebook, Apple.