Cut|Color|Post

excerpts, quips, and musings on the production and post-production industry, and other stuff of interest

C300 Mark II Likely To Cost More Than Sony FS7

In regards to the upcoming NAB 2015, here's a nugget from Canon Rumors:

This will be the star of Canon’s show. It will shoot 4K and you can also expect some minor ergonomic changes. We also think that it’s going to cost more than Sony’s FS7.

Unfortunately, I think this is completely accurate. While the C300 Mark II should only cost $8K, like the Sony FS7, I'm guessing it'll cost closer to $10K or even $12K (or $16K as announced on April 8). Reason being: I don't think Canon believes the FS7 to be a competitor to this camera. I can see why Canon would believe this, but in the marketplace the consumer sees these two cameras as in the same class, even if the manufacturers do not.

I think this line of reasoning is further supported if you look at Canon's current price breakdown pyramid for their Cinema EOS lineup (current mark down pricing is listed below):

Canon C100 Mark 1 - $2,999 (link)

Canon C100 Mark II - $5,499 (link)

Canon C300 Mark I - $6,999 (link)

Canon C300 Mark II - $15,999 (link) - updated after Canon announcement

Canon C500 Mark I - $15,999 (link)

Canon C500 Mark II - $19,999 or $24,999 (speculative)

I also wouldn't be surprised for Canon to pull a page out of Apple's iPhone playbook and continue to sell the previous version of their Cinema EOS camera at a reduced price. That would allow Canon to sell a Cinema EOS camera at nearly every price point. And if there's one thing that Canon (and Apple) is good at it's providing a product offering at nearly every conceivable price point (specs are different story!). If the product pyramid that I've outlined above holds that would allow Canon to sell a camera as inexpensively as $3K and as premium as $25K.

Additionally, if you're in the market for a great 1080p camera the original C100's and C300's are absolute steals at those prices. Since 98% of projects today (2015) are finished and presented in HD 1080i/p, those cameras will still get the job done well for the next several years. I have no intention of giving my EOS cameras up at this point, and may even add an additional one soon!


Canon 5D Mark IV

Northlight is reporting they’ve been told that the EOS 5D Mark IV isn’t scheduled to be announced until the fall of 2015 at the earliest, and that we won’t be seeing it until the EOS 5DS/5DS R are shipping in reasonable numbers. It was interesting that they also mentioned that current EOS 5D Mark III sales are still good and that may delay the release of the EOS 5D Mark IV until after the EOS-1D X Mark II is announced. It sounds like this has yet to be decided.

If true, I find that very interesting, particularly that the "Mark III sales are still good." While many people bag on Canon's lack of "innovation" (I'm looking at you EOSHD.com) their products sell well to many segments - photo, video, news, cinema, etc. While I also hope Canon releases some face-melting cameras this year, they are a business. And if their products are selling well it's understandable that they may delay an announcement for a replacement product to avoid the Osborne effect.


The GH4 and DSLR Cinematography

In fairness though, the GH4 is not so much a ‘replacement’ for a professional cinema camera, more an additional option for the filmmaker which will be selected when the unique abilities of the tool are required by certain work. The simple fact that there’s even a comparison to be made to a $15,000 cinema camera says a lot about how far Panasonic has reached to connect with filmmakers.

I think you could also say how well designed, both ergonomically and technologically, the C300 is, that even after 3 years of being on the market it still sells/rents so well. As a corporate video pro the C300 is my preferred camera for shoots. I can shoot outside in bright daylight, inside in a dimly lit environments with minimal extra gear (rigs, recorders, XLR packs, screens, etc.). Everything I need to pull of a quick shot is onboard the C300 from Day 1. Even today in the growing world of 4k this and 4k that, the C300 still creates a crisp 1080p image that I turn to time and again for my day-to-day work.

That said, there are more and more cameras that are starting to look appealing to me (none of which are DSLR based cameras). Specifically, the Sony FS7, when it ships, looks like another winner for cinema, corporate, or event shooters. The XAVC codec continues to get praise from every corner of the industry. Sony may have finally produced a camera "for the rest of us" in the FS7 for around $8K according to pre-order pages.


Where the 7D Mark II Fits

Despite having used a 7DmkI for 3 years, it is clear to me that the 7DmkII is not a portrait focused camera. If you read the announcement and specifications, it is obvious the rumor mill had been correct regarding one main theory about Canon’s intentions with the 7DmkII: It is clearly designed for sports and event photography mainly. You can candidly call it a baby 1D, perhaps, but reading up on the 7DmkII’s specifications clearly shows a camera body that was designed for action, wildlife, sports, and events. Canon even excitedly compares it to the 5DmkIII, and state that the new 7D is ideal for weddings.

This is what Canon built the 7DII for - sports and event photography. It's not your next video camera. It's not your 4K monster. It's not your lowlight video king. It's not your super cheap, Super35 high-end codec camera. It's a DSLR! Period. Remember those....the ones that take pictures? And it takes pictures of fast moving objects while tracking them and keeping them in focus!

Take a look at some of the specs: 65 point AF, built in intrevalometer, 10fps (31 RAW and over 1,000 JPEG as long as your card is fast enough to write the data), automatic lens distortion correction in-camera, GPS, weather-sealed aluminum body, and a completely revamped and upgraded metering system. These are features video guys/gals don't care about. Action photographers do. This camera makes a legitimate swipe at the Canon 1D X and Nikon D4S for a third of the price (yet, there are still reasons why a photographer might want a 1D X or D4S over a 7DII).

If Canon wanted to announce a new video camera, DSLR or not, it had NAB in April or IBC last weekend in Amsterdam. But they didn't. They announced the 7DII at Photokina, a photography show. That should say a significant something about where they intend to position this camera in their lineup.

Read the specs and press release for Canon's 7D Mark II here.


Will Canon have a Cinema EOS Announcement at Photokina

From Canon Rumors:

I received a vague hint that Canon could be making a surprise Cinema EOS announcement for Photokina. There was no mention of what it could be, or whether or not it was a product announcement or a development announcement.

I'm curious to see if Canon announces any C-series products this weekend. Given how well the series is selling I'm guessing Canon doesn't feel a whole lot of pressure to do so. And they'll also want to avoid the Osborne effect with any announcement they do make.

Photokina officially starts next Tuesday (September 16). Much like NAB though, announcements tend to start coming out the weekend before.