Cut|Color|Post

excerpts, quips, and musings on the production and post-production industry, and other stuff of interest

Samsung Develops 16TB SSD

The piece goes on to say, “In 2013, Samsung announced a new way of approaching flash storage manufacturing. Rather than place the cells along a single layer, as had been standard practice since NAND flash was invented in the 1980s, it would stack them vertically. That allows for much greater density, which gives you much more storage space.

This could radically transform post-production. As cameras get more and more data rate intensive with HDR, UHD, 4K or higher resolutions our ability to access that data quickly for realtime playback becomes an ever increasing challenge. This could provide both speed and size flexibility for post professionals.

Read more here or here.

Moving From FCP to PPro

Meagan Keane of Adobe interviews editor, Andrea B. Scott, on the 2015 Sundance Film Festival documentary "Fresh Dressed"

Adobe: Which features of Adobe Premiere Pro CC were most useful?

Scott: Certain aspects of working within the timeline are much easier than with Final Cut Pro. Even small things are really nice, like the ability to hoverscrub through the footage. Another helpful feature of working with Premiere Pro CC is its ability to work with different codecs in the timeline, without worrying about transcoding.

I'll continue to say it: all modern NLE's are capable of producing high-quality content for broadcast television or film. Apple Final Cut Pro X, Adobe Premiere Pro CC, and Avid Media Composer all have the ability to cut your story and cut it well. The difference is in the user and which product makes the most sense for a given workflow. Stop the nonsense about whether not NLE is faster than that NLE, or if <fill in the blank> NLE is "pro"...they are all capable choices in the hands of the right person.


Should A Video Editor Buy a Mac Pro or iMac

If money is not a big concern, don’t waste any more time – get the Mac Pro. While the 12-core system provides maximum bragging rights, the 8-core system is a better value with great performance.

If your budget is constrained, get an iMac. It is outstanding as an editing system and, while not as fast in video compression or rendering, what you lose in time you’ll save in dollars.

I run both at my shop and they each have distinct advantages (the 5K Retina screen is gorgeous). It's always a trade-off between speed and cost. The faster you want to go, the more money it's going to cost. For many of today's task an iMac is a great machine. But if you need the horsepower for transcoding you're not going to beat a Mac Pro.


The New MacBook

The MacBook itself, meanwhile, runs quite well for a device powered by a Core M processor and with no fan inside. Based on a few minutes of web browsing, typing my name over and over in a Pages document, and poking through Numbers, it seems like it’s up to the tasks for which it is clearly meant. It’s not for gaming, it’s probably not for editing video, but it does the basics really well.

It's a MacBook. Not a MacBook Pro. This machine is for general, simple computing tasks - Word Processing, Facebook, Twitter, online shopping, etc. It is not meant for heavy computational tasks, like photo/video editing, color grading, compositing, or audio production - it has an Intel Core M processor and integrated Intel HD Graphics 5300 GPU for crying out loud. Those aren't powerful chipsets. If you need a lightweight, ultra portable machine that lasts all day and has an absolutely gorgeous screen...this is your machine!


Avid MC Steps Boldly Into 2012

As of today, Media Composer | Software allows for native editing of 2K, editing 4K and UHD as well as DNxHR, all part of Avid Resolution Independence. This latest update was announced at Avid Connect Europe 2014 and is all about High-Resolution edit, output, export, and the new DNxHR codec.

Mmmmmmm...Smells Like Vaporware

Frame.io writing in their most recent newsletter:

It’s been 6 months since the first announcement, this smells like vaporware

The app is very real and works exactly as advertised. But it’s true, we’re behind schedule. When we announced Frame.io in July of 2014 we were overly optimistic about our target release date. It’s a complex app that you will come to rely on for your business. We take this very seriously and want to make sure you can count on us.

I hope that Frame can move from vaporware to an actual shipping product because their take on review and approval looks excellent. But if you need something today, their solution isn't going to get the job done. If you need a review and approval solution today then check out Scott Simmons' post from May 2014. There are quite a few good options out there already.