Cut|Color|Post

excerpts, quips, and musings on the production and post-production industry, and other stuff of interest

Try Before You Buy AJA CION

If you're interested in the AJA CION then you may be in luck. AJA is running a promotional program to push the camera into the hands of the production community. If you fill out a short questionnaire and submit that to AJA they'll determine if your project meets the criteria for them to loan you a camera (and some corresponding gear) for your shoot. 

Ready to try the CION production camera on your own shoot?

Simply fill out the form below to start the application process. Your application will be reviewed by AJA, and if approved, you’ll be notified when to expect delivery of your loaner CION camera and associated accessories. We will begin the approval process soon!

Once you receive your CION camera you’ll be able to see for yourself the cinematic, film-like quality of CION.

Please note that the #TryCION program is currently available in North America only. Be sure to read the details of the program at the bottom of this page.

You can check out AJA #TRYCION program here.

Moving From FCP to PPro

Meagan Keane of Adobe interviews editor, Andrea B. Scott, on the 2015 Sundance Film Festival documentary "Fresh Dressed"

Adobe: Which features of Adobe Premiere Pro CC were most useful?

Scott: Certain aspects of working within the timeline are much easier than with Final Cut Pro. Even small things are really nice, like the ability to hoverscrub through the footage. Another helpful feature of working with Premiere Pro CC is its ability to work with different codecs in the timeline, without worrying about transcoding.

I'll continue to say it: all modern NLE's are capable of producing high-quality content for broadcast television or film. Apple Final Cut Pro X, Adobe Premiere Pro CC, and Avid Media Composer all have the ability to cut your story and cut it well. The difference is in the user and which product makes the most sense for a given workflow. Stop the nonsense about whether not NLE is faster than that NLE, or if <fill in the blank> NLE is "pro"...they are all capable choices in the hands of the right person.


Amazon Studios Looks to The Big Screen

The media production arm of the e-commerce giant will produce and acquire up to 12 original films a year that will premiere on Prime Instant Video 4 to 8 weeks after their theatrical debut. This is a much shorter time frame than the typical 39 to 52 weeks it takes for movies to make it to a streaming platform.

This story got buried in my notes. Amazon announced this back in January, and if you take a look at Prime Instant Video you can see they've started to make up ground on their competitors for recent content.


Arri Alexa Mini Announced

What an unfamiliar sensation to write the words “lightweight” and “ARRI” in the same headline. But here it is: Camera manufacturer ARRI just surprised us with the announcement of a new cinema camera: The ARRI ALEXA Mini. A small and lightweight, carbon fibre version of their hugely popular ARRI ALEXA cinema camera.

This camera from Arri will finish off what was left of RED in Hollywood. The previous case for RED was the ability to fly their camera body on a variety of drones, jibs, and rigs. Now if a director is shooting on Alexas or Amiras (and who isn't in Hollywood?) and need to get a mobile shot or into a tight space they're going to grab the Mini, not the RED.

Further irony that this Arri announcement came on the heels of RED's Weapon camera upgrade announcement. I doubt that's a coincidence.

TIP: ShotOnWhat is a great resource if you're curious about what camera was used on a given movie.


HBO Goes Over The Top

HBO announced Wednesday that it would start a stand-alone Internet streaming service in the United States in 2015 that would not require a subscription to a traditional television service, a move that intensifies the premium cable network’s growing rivalry with Netflix.

[...]

“The tech companies of the world have turned it on faster and better,” said Jeffrey L. Bewkes, the chief executive of HBO’s parent Time Warner. “We have also had to say today, we’re also going to do it.”

Several details for HBO’s new service remain to be worked out, including what content is available, the subscription fee and the distribution models. HBO now makes its programming available over the web to paying TV subscribers through its HBO Go service. Executives said that the content available through its new online-only offering would be similar. HBO is unlikely to undercut the $15 monthly rate viewers pay to cable or satellite companies for a subscription to the service, executives said.

The question intensifies: Can HBO become like Netflix sooner than Netflix can become like HBO? Netflix pushed into HBO's territory with original series like House of Cards, Orange is the New Black, Hemlock Grove, Lilyhammer, and others. HBO now responds to Netflix by going direct to customers with a subscription (read: Netflix) plan.

I still wonder if they charge $15/month will they restrict access to older content, thereby giving the traditional HBO subscription through a telco some legitimacy for existence. Color me disappointed if they charge $15/month for just new releases or "some" of HBO's content.

More information regarding HBO's announcement from Re/code

Even Without Aereo, Those Problems Don't Go Away

Americans are still fed up with huge channel bundles, high prices, poor service and the lack of ability to watch all their shows on all their devices. That’s part of why Aereo was attractive: It offered a few dozen local broadcast channels and the Bloomberg TV financial channel on multiple devices for just $8 a month.

Industry watchers say the pay TV business must continue to evolve to win over unhappy customers, even if the nation’s top court said grabbing signals from the airwaves and distributing them online without content-owner permission isn’t the way.

”Even without Aereo, the reason people were cutting the cord, for cost reasons and so on, those don’t go away,” said Robin Flynn, an analyst with market research firm SNL Kagan.

Robin's right. Killing Aereo doesn't stop their problem. In the same way that shutting down Napster didn't help the RIAA. The problem is that technology is moving faster than these companies. And the companies want to continue to sit on their profit margins more than serve their customer base. It's only a matter of time until a company, product, or service crops up that really addresses how customers consume media (anytime, anywhere, on any device) and forces the main telcos to adapt. Or if it plays out like the RIAA, until an Apple like company throws the telcos a lifeline via an iTunes-esque software/service and then begins to shift the balance of power.