Cut|Color|Post

excerpts, quips, and musings on the production and post-production industry, and other stuff of interest

Canon 5D Mark IV

Northlight is reporting they’ve been told that the EOS 5D Mark IV isn’t scheduled to be announced until the fall of 2015 at the earliest, and that we won’t be seeing it until the EOS 5DS/5DS R are shipping in reasonable numbers. It was interesting that they also mentioned that current EOS 5D Mark III sales are still good and that may delay the release of the EOS 5D Mark IV until after the EOS-1D X Mark II is announced. It sounds like this has yet to be decided.

If true, I find that very interesting, particularly that the "Mark III sales are still good." While many people bag on Canon's lack of "innovation" (I'm looking at you EOSHD.com) their products sell well to many segments - photo, video, news, cinema, etc. While I also hope Canon releases some face-melting cameras this year, they are a business. And if their products are selling well it's understandable that they may delay an announcement for a replacement product to avoid the Osborne effect.


You've Gotta Train People to Look at Things

This is a good way to spend your next 30 minutes. Cinematographers Geoff Boyle, Rodney Charters, and Bill Bennett talking about 4K, 3D, VR, lighting, and learning to see.

Where the 7D Mark II Fits

Despite having used a 7DmkI for 3 years, it is clear to me that the 7DmkII is not a portrait focused camera. If you read the announcement and specifications, it is obvious the rumor mill had been correct regarding one main theory about Canon’s intentions with the 7DmkII: It is clearly designed for sports and event photography mainly. You can candidly call it a baby 1D, perhaps, but reading up on the 7DmkII’s specifications clearly shows a camera body that was designed for action, wildlife, sports, and events. Canon even excitedly compares it to the 5DmkIII, and state that the new 7D is ideal for weddings.

This is what Canon built the 7DII for - sports and event photography. It's not your next video camera. It's not your 4K monster. It's not your lowlight video king. It's not your super cheap, Super35 high-end codec camera. It's a DSLR! Period. Remember those....the ones that take pictures? And it takes pictures of fast moving objects while tracking them and keeping them in focus!

Take a look at some of the specs: 65 point AF, built in intrevalometer, 10fps (31 RAW and over 1,000 JPEG as long as your card is fast enough to write the data), automatic lens distortion correction in-camera, GPS, weather-sealed aluminum body, and a completely revamped and upgraded metering system. These are features video guys/gals don't care about. Action photographers do. This camera makes a legitimate swipe at the Canon 1D X and Nikon D4S for a third of the price (yet, there are still reasons why a photographer might want a 1D X or D4S over a 7DII).

If Canon wanted to announce a new video camera, DSLR or not, it had NAB in April or IBC last weekend in Amsterdam. But they didn't. They announced the 7DII at Photokina, a photography show. That should say a significant something about where they intend to position this camera in their lineup.

Read the specs and press release for Canon's 7D Mark II here.


Saying No to Work

When I arrived, the organizers were nothing short of total jerks. No one so much as smiled in my direction, and I was ordered around like some shifty teenager who might dash out at any moment, a bottle of stolen champagne tucked in my jacket pocket.

Cause or no cause, the event turned out to be one of the least meaningful photographic experiences of my life, an abrasive series of grip-’n’-grins that said nothing, inspired nothing, meant nothing.

And just like that, I was done. I completed my contract, delivered the photographs, cashed my check, and vowed to say NO to work that didn’t align with my personal desires.

Saying "No" to work is one of the hardest things to do. It can also be one of the most rewarding.


Apple Kills Aperture Development

If you watched Apple's 2014 WWDC presentation then you probably saw this one coming. Apple is ending development of Aperture and iPhoto for OS X. The new app Photos is scheduled to replace the professional and consumer apps. From Jim Dalrymple of The Loop:

Apple introduced a new Photos app during its Worldwide Developers Conference that will become the new platform for the company. As part of the transition, Apple told me today that they will no longer be developing its professional photography application, Aperture.

“With the introduction of the new Photos app and iCloud Photo Library, enabling you to safely store all of your photos in iCloud and access them from anywhere, there will be no new development of Aperture,” said Apple in a statement provided to The Loop. “When Photos for OS X ships next year, users will be able to migrate their existing Aperture libraries to Photos for OS.”

You can add this to the growing line of professional apps that Apple has killed off without warning for users - Shake, Final Cut Server, Final Cut Pro 7, DVD Studio Pro, etc. It's one of the reasons that I am not a skeptical Apple software users. Any Apple software I use I do so with the intent of not marrying myself to it because inevitably Apple will pull the rug out from under you.

At least this time it appears that Apple will give users a way to migrate their libraries from Aperture to the new Photos app. Something I wish would've been allowed when FCP X was released in 2011.

This is also a great time to add, if you're not a Lightroom CC user there's no better time to join up!