Cut|Color|Post

excerpts, quips, and musings on the production and post-production industry, and other stuff of interest

Moving From FCP to PPro

Meagan Keane of Adobe interviews editor, Andrea B. Scott, on the 2015 Sundance Film Festival documentary "Fresh Dressed"

Adobe: Which features of Adobe Premiere Pro CC were most useful?

Scott: Certain aspects of working within the timeline are much easier than with Final Cut Pro. Even small things are really nice, like the ability to hoverscrub through the footage. Another helpful feature of working with Premiere Pro CC is its ability to work with different codecs in the timeline, without worrying about transcoding.

I'll continue to say it: all modern NLE's are capable of producing high-quality content for broadcast television or film. Apple Final Cut Pro X, Adobe Premiere Pro CC, and Avid Media Composer all have the ability to cut your story and cut it well. The difference is in the user and which product makes the most sense for a given workflow. Stop the nonsense about whether not NLE is faster than that NLE, or if <fill in the blank> NLE is "pro"...they are all capable choices in the hands of the right person.


Amazon Studios Looks to The Big Screen

The media production arm of the e-commerce giant will produce and acquire up to 12 original films a year that will premiere on Prime Instant Video 4 to 8 weeks after their theatrical debut. This is a much shorter time frame than the typical 39 to 52 weeks it takes for movies to make it to a streaming platform.

This story got buried in my notes. Amazon announced this back in January, and if you take a look at Prime Instant Video you can see they've started to make up ground on their competitors for recent content.


Avid MC Steps Boldly Into 2012

As of today, Media Composer | Software allows for native editing of 2K, editing 4K and UHD as well as DNxHR, all part of Avid Resolution Independence. This latest update was announced at Avid Connect Europe 2014 and is all about High-Resolution edit, output, export, and the new DNxHR codec.

Competing for Your Most Valuable Resource

Philip Hodgetts in regards to Twitch (it's like YouTube for video games):

Watching game play has become a huge audience, with very low production costs. While it’s not traditional production, the time spent watching gamers play video games, erodes the time available for other forms of entertainment, specifically films and television!

I think this concept stretches to many different mediums now. Your Xbox, iPhone, AppleTV, Roku, traditional broadcast TV, cinema, Redbox, YouTube, Twitch, Twitter, Facebook...they are all competing for your most valuable resource - your time. We all have the same amount of hours in a week and how we chose to spend them means we're choosing one medium/format over another.


The GH4 and DSLR Cinematography

In fairness though, the GH4 is not so much a ‘replacement’ for a professional cinema camera, more an additional option for the filmmaker which will be selected when the unique abilities of the tool are required by certain work. The simple fact that there’s even a comparison to be made to a $15,000 cinema camera says a lot about how far Panasonic has reached to connect with filmmakers.

I think you could also say how well designed, both ergonomically and technologically, the C300 is, that even after 3 years of being on the market it still sells/rents so well. As a corporate video pro the C300 is my preferred camera for shoots. I can shoot outside in bright daylight, inside in a dimly lit environments with minimal extra gear (rigs, recorders, XLR packs, screens, etc.). Everything I need to pull of a quick shot is onboard the C300 from Day 1. Even today in the growing world of 4k this and 4k that, the C300 still creates a crisp 1080p image that I turn to time and again for my day-to-day work.

That said, there are more and more cameras that are starting to look appealing to me (none of which are DSLR based cameras). Specifically, the Sony FS7, when it ships, looks like another winner for cinema, corporate, or event shooters. The XAVC codec continues to get praise from every corner of the industry. Sony may have finally produced a camera "for the rest of us" in the FS7 for around $8K according to pre-order pages.


HBO Goes Over The Top

HBO announced Wednesday that it would start a stand-alone Internet streaming service in the United States in 2015 that would not require a subscription to a traditional television service, a move that intensifies the premium cable network’s growing rivalry with Netflix.

[...]

“The tech companies of the world have turned it on faster and better,” said Jeffrey L. Bewkes, the chief executive of HBO’s parent Time Warner. “We have also had to say today, we’re also going to do it.”

Several details for HBO’s new service remain to be worked out, including what content is available, the subscription fee and the distribution models. HBO now makes its programming available over the web to paying TV subscribers through its HBO Go service. Executives said that the content available through its new online-only offering would be similar. HBO is unlikely to undercut the $15 monthly rate viewers pay to cable or satellite companies for a subscription to the service, executives said.

The question intensifies: Can HBO become like Netflix sooner than Netflix can become like HBO? Netflix pushed into HBO's territory with original series like House of Cards, Orange is the New Black, Hemlock Grove, Lilyhammer, and others. HBO now responds to Netflix by going direct to customers with a subscription (read: Netflix) plan.

I still wonder if they charge $15/month will they restrict access to older content, thereby giving the traditional HBO subscription through a telco some legitimacy for existence. Color me disappointed if they charge $15/month for just new releases or "some" of HBO's content.

More information regarding HBO's announcement from Re/code